Atlantic ASW Patrol
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WW II Atlantic ASW Patrol on the 83331

(Jack is on the left side)

In his own words Jack Parker, SM 2c

It's amazing that after almost 60 years I can remember some things so vividly and others I can't recall no matter how hard I try. After finishing boot camp and signal school at Manhattan Beach in Brooklyn, N.Y. in the latter part of 1943, I was assigned to the 83331 stationed at Little Creek outside of Norfolk, VA.

During our Atlantic ASW duties we generally run a patrol for a period of three days and return to Little Creek for one day to load up on food and supplies and refill our gas tanks. Due to the fact that we carried about 2000 gals. of gasoline and with our Sterling Viking engines we burned a lot of fuel and therefore we could only stay out for three days. The only exception to this was when we would accompany a buoy tender and end up in Moorehead City N.C. or Cape May N.J.. While on these patrols we would normally stand sea watches of 4 hrs. on and 8 hrs. off. We had a few occasions when due to men being on leave etc. we then would stand watches of 4 hrs. on and 4 hrs. off. This was a little tough particularly during the winter months when we would be covered with ice and of course with the 83footers 98% of steering would be from the outside flying bridge.

Our crew consisted of 13 men and one officer usually a j.g... Our skipper was Lt. j.g. David B. Gray. I believe he is still alive at the age of 91and resides in Panama City Fl. . Our crew were all rated specialists and we had no seamen therefore we all stood sea watches normally with 2 men taking turns at the wheel and as lookout. In addition there would be a motor machinist mate on duty in the engine room. Our speed was normally slow and medium speeds while on patrol to conserve fuel and I believe we used both engines since it gave us better control while steering.

 

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(Click image to enlarge)

 

Believe it or not, I hand carved the hull and the pilot house of my model. I had no plans only photos and great memories. I had never been able to carve anything before or since and I will let you decide who was guiding my hand. I only had a couple of old photos left and in bad condition.  Jack